CLASS CONSCIOUSNESS AND THE NIGERIAN CONDITION | by Ayo Sogunro
Essays / The Pontifical Papers

CLASS CONSCIOUSNESS AND THE NIGERIAN CONDITION | by Ayo Sogunro

This week, as Nigeria observes “Democracy Day” and civil society honours the memory of victims of violence, we are once more compelled to reflect on the value of the Nigerian citizenship. Clearly, Nigeria is not getting better. In fact, it has worsened steadily since October 1, 1960. Thanks to modern technology, this fact is often … Continue reading

LOOK NIGERIANS, CAN WE PLEASE SHUT UP THE RATIONALISING? | by Ayo Sogunro
Essays / The Pontifical Papers

LOOK NIGERIANS, CAN WE PLEASE SHUT UP THE RATIONALISING? | by Ayo Sogunro

  I received with regret news that the Air Force,working to mop up BH insurgents, accidentally bombed a civilian community in Rann,Borno State — Muhammadu Buhari (@MBuhari) January 17, 2017 I may have lost my sanity at some point this week. This is one explanation for why I think the “accidental” bombing of Nigerian citizens … Continue reading

Essays / The Pontifical Papers

REJECTING THE PROMISED LAND | by Ayo Sogunro

One of the more convenient allusions used by patrons of the current administration to justify—and raise hope for—Nigeria’s economic state is that of the “journey through the wilderness”. For example, during a church statement last week, the vice president made reference to this analogy. He suggested that the president was the equivalent of the biblical … Continue reading

Essays / The Pontifical Papers

MORE HARD WORDS FOR THE UNILAG SENATE | by Ayo Sogunro

Once again, I am constrained to consider the University of Lagos and its increasingly intolerant attitude towards student rebellion. I have previously written on this in reference to the school’s high-handedness when it dealt with the aftermath of a student protest. I was–and still am–astonished by the degree of repression imposed by the university’s Senate. … Continue reading

Essays / The Pontifical Papers

ON CLASSTHINK AND THE “OTHER” NIGERIA | by Ayo Sogunro

I have previously written on our “classthink” mentality in Nigeria. Classthink explains why those of us who are members of the educated middle class often overlook the circumstances of poor Nigerians when discussing government policy. We weigh government policy from the perspective of our immediate environments. If the policy works for us, then it is … Continue reading