Essays / The Pontifical Papers

NIGERIAN YOUTHS, IT’S TIME WE RESIST ‘THE SYSTEM’ | by Ayo Sogunro

Over the last few weeks, the political actors of Nigeria served us fresh drama. This time, the plot revolved around the ownership and purpose of some millions of dollars discovered in a flat in Lagos. Like any good thriller, it contained the elements of crime and corruption, heroes and villains, suspense, political intrigue, betrayal, and … Continue reading

Essays / The Pontifical Papers

ON OFFICIAL POSITIONS AND PUBLIC DISPOSITIONS | by Ayo Sogunro

Last week, a news analyst for a Lagos radio station suggested that Justice Adeniyi Ademola—of the DSS infamy—ought to present his case in court, and not engage in issuing media statements. When someone reminded the analyst that, in fact, the EFCC had used this style of media engagement to make damning insinuations against some judges, … Continue reading

Essays / The Pontifical Papers

HELLO PRESIDENT BUHARI, LISTEN TO THE JUDICIARY | by Ayo Sogunro

Last week, in his Independence anniversary speech, President Muhammadu Buhari threw a jab at the Nigerian judiciary. The president said: “In fighting corruption, however, the government would adhere strictly by the rule of law. Not for the first time I am appealing to the judiciary to join the fight against corruption”. These words not only … Continue reading

Essays / The Pontifical Papers

A NOTE ON THE NIGERIAN LEGAL ORDER | by Ayo Sogunro

Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, first Prime Minister of Nigeria, was not always a believer in the necessity of Nigeria’s continued union after independence was achieved. Somehow, however, he became a convert to the need for a “Nigerian” state. Why he changed his mind may not be clear, but what he said about British cooperation in his … Continue reading

Essays / The Pontifical Papers

WAGING A NEW WAR AGAINST INDISCIPLINE | by Ayo Sogunro

Nigeria is not a democratic country. Although generally described as a democracy, Nigeria is, in reality, an anocracy. An anocracy is a system of government that is half democratic, half autocratic. In true democracies, authority progresses upwards from the people to a dependent centre. In true autocracies, authority flows downwards from an independent centre to … Continue reading

Essays / The Pontifical Papers

ON NIGERIAN MILITARISM AND THE CHILCOT REPORT | by Ayo Sogunro

Last week, the Chilcot Inquiry—the British public inquiry into the nature and causes of UK’s involvement in the Iraqi war—published its report. Generally, the report concluded that there was no satisfactory legal basis for the invasion of Iraq. Military action commenced before peaceful options were exhausted; military action at the time was not a last resort … Continue reading